4th Hoosier and Runner Day - HBO Military Boys Appreciation Month

4th Hoosier and Runner Day - HBO Military Boys Appreciation Month

izmonsters:

michelinamarie:

Q: Can you talk about that scene on the train with Burgin, Snafu, and Sledgehammer? How accurate was that (I assume you talked to Burgin about it)? Also, what prompted the decision to let Snafu walk out silently into the night? It was a fitting coda, given he lost touch with the other men, and one of the [most] gut-wrenching scenes I have every watched. Here are two guys that served through two islands of hell together, and he chooses to walk away without so much as a goodbye. 
A: No one is sure how Snafu got home, and no one knows if he and Sledge went together, although it may have been likely if they were mustered out together. Snafu walking out silently was one of my favourite scenes to write and see on film. Unfortunately, the Brass above me cut a scene before that where Sledge looked at Snafu sleeping on his seat in the train…and Sledge writing in his Bible. It would have made Snafu’s silent exit, his dissolve into the masses of civilians, much more powerful. But as it is…lots of vets have commented on it as really moving and accurate. They had a tremendous feeling of disorientation back home…and didn’t know how to deal with home or their comrades. — Bruce McKenna: Making of The Pacific Insider Blog

Oh my god.

izmonsters:

michelinamarie:

Q: Can you talk about that scene on the train with Burgin, Snafu, and Sledgehammer? How accurate was that (I assume you talked to Burgin about it)? Also, what prompted the decision to let Snafu walk out silently into the night? It was a fitting coda, given he lost touch with the other men, and one of the [most] gut-wrenching scenes I have every watched. Here are two guys that served through two islands of hell together, and he chooses to walk away without so much as a goodbye.

A: No one is sure how Snafu got home, and no one knows if he and Sledge went together, although it may have been likely if they were mustered out together. Snafu walking out silently was one of my favourite scenes to write and see on film. Unfortunately, the Brass above me cut a scene before that where Sledge looked at Snafu sleeping on his seat in the train…and Sledge writing in his Bible. It would have made Snafu’s silent exit, his dissolve into the masses of civilians, much more powerful. But as it is…lots of vets have commented on it as really moving and accurate. They had a tremendous feeling of disorientation back home…and didn’t know how to deal with home or their comrades.

— Bruce McKenna: Making of The Pacific Insider Blog

Oh my god.